How does coaching help you launch a new career?

Updated: Feb 23



More than ever before there is a sense of needing to be able to find your purpose, what gets you up in the morning and makes you feel motivated. A lot of us are questioning what we do as a job, and if it’s what we want out of the future.


When making those choices, a well-thought-out approach to job preparation or transformation will be extremely helpful. It necessitates determining a specific course of action, gaining concentration, and devising a strategy. One with which a mentor will assist you.


Of course, time may not be on your side, but whether it is, whether you are employed or not, it is well worth your time to go through this exercise and consider what you most expect from your future.


I believe this is a three-stage approach:


Stage 1: Getting to know yourself


Many people begin by learning more about themselves. It's something we think we know and do, but reflecting on it and writing it down can be a fantastic practice for supporting career transition and is a great place to start.


Certain bosses, as well as leaders and administrators, will either align with our beliefs or work against them. This has been my experience with the organizations and individuals I've worked with in my career. For me, it's been a lot happier experience, and I believe I've delivered more when an organization and its leaders share my beliefs.


The next step is to identify your core attributes and abilities. What do you excel at, and how can you illustrate it with examples from your previous work experience? What are some fields of growth where you might spend some time? Many work applications and interviews will have questions about your abilities and talents, so knowing enough about them and being able to include some great examples of how you have used them successfully is critical.


Since skills are the foundation of your CV, it's critical to identify and understand which ones are most appropriate for each position you apply for. You should also do your own 360 analysis by asking those for whom you've served about their opinions about your abilities and weaknesses.


Looking back on your career and writing down the top ten good moments – this can be where you feel you have the greatest impact, were the most inspired, fulfilled, and performed well on your organization – is one place that can be very powerful. When you write them down and examine the situation, the job, the steps you took, and the outcomes of your actions, you'll see a trend emerge.


A pattern of abilities and skills that you used, as well as areas that you may like to experience again, will help you decide what task to take next. This also serves as excellent practice for work submissions and interviews. As most talents are transferable, which ones do you excel at and choose to use more frequently?


Stage 2: Determining what you desire


It's difficult to decide what kind of career we want, and we can waste hours applying for any work that seems like it would be a good fit. This not only consumes hours of our day, it also leaves us with little time to focus on the positions we really like. Applying for less positions and spending more time on them is preferable to a blanket solution. What ones, though?


When you're trying to figure out what you want out of your future, a 'career prioritization' exercise will help. Make a list of the things that are most important to you and what they are. Place, pay, responsibility, knowledge you choose to use, the degree to which it offers you meaning in life, whether it builds on previous experience or is different, work/life balance, flexibility, difficulty, and working conditions are all factors to consider. It may be a combination of these or other fields. Then priorities them – what are the top five things that are extremely important to you on the path to your future career?

This stage also necessitates any analysis – what role ideas you have for the future, and the kinds of employers you'd like to work for. Which employers may have the openings you're looking for? Make a list of the kinds of jobs and companies you want to pursue, as well as particular ones. It's awesome how following this method will help you focus your thoughts and find out what you expect from your future.


Tell those you meet that these are the kinds of jobs and companies you're looking for, and you may be shocked by how many openings come your way.


Stage 3: How do you get what you want after that?


It is important, in my opinion, to develop your own brand. That is, how do people see you and how do they find you, and what is their perception of you? Can they see you as a person who can fit into a variety of roles and could be exactly what they're looking for, or as a person who can fit into a variety of roles and could be exactly what they're looking for?


This necessitates much thought and effort in areas such as your LinkedIn profile and CV. It also necessitates carefully tailoring your CV and applications to each job you apply for, spending time balancing what an applicant is looking for in terms of material and, in some cases, vocabulary.


Direct marketing – You don't have to wait for a job to be posted if you have a top ten list of companies you'd like to work for. A well-crafted direct strategy will hold you on their radar for potential prospects.


Act under the assumption that the work you're doing here, followed by your submission, is aimed at getting you an interview with the right job with the right employer. After that, getting the position is the result of giving a perfect interview. This will take some time to master. An interview can include both a presentation and questions. We also spend a lot of time preparing for the introduction but not so much time preparing for the questions. The pre-work you've done here should have yielded some excellent examples for you to use. Be sure you have someone to do mock interviews with you – this is very beneficial.


It is your career, and investing time in preparing your future will help you achieve your goals.


Act under the assumption that the work you're doing here, followed by your submission, is aimed at getting you an interview with the right job with the right employer. After that, getting the position is the result of giving a perfect interview. This will take some time to master. An interview can include both a presentation and questions. We also spend a lot of time preparing for the introduction but not so much time preparing for the questions. The pre-work you've done here should have yielded some excellent examples for you to use. Be sure you have someone to do mock interviews with you – this is very beneficial.


It is your career, and investing time in preparing your future will help you achieve your goals.

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